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strong. like education, the ability of students to attend college, medical research and inthe noah vation, the about of -- ability of our older neighbors to live their lives in dignity in their retirement years through medicare and long-term care. now we get a lot of advice and economists across the board, in fact, our own congressional budget office, advise that the best and fastest way to reduce the deficit to is to make sure people across america have jobs and are working. it is inexplicable that the republican budget proposes to eliminate jobs in construction, in education, scientific research, and instead heaps the burden on middle class families. experts predict the republican budget will reresult in job losses of two million fewer jobs next year alone. that's on top of 750,000 jobs lost by the end of the year due to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close t
to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fiscal year 2014 budget and democratic alternatives that work. i first want to thank my colleague, mr. ho
. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
educated myself, i trained to become a rape crisis advocate and joined a few boards, i got involved. i am so proud to be on a show that was brave enough to go into a territory that nobody else is talking about. obviously, i had my role to play on television, but after learning what i learned in hearing the statistics in receiving these letters, i knew that i wanted to do more. i wanted to play a larger role in helping survivors heal and reclaim their lives. in 2004, i started the joyful heart foundation. our mission is to heal, and power and educate survivors of the mystic, sexual assault, and child abuse. and shed light on the darkness that surrounds these issues. i get emotional. because of our ceo, we have raised more than $10 million -- [applause] thank you. let me try that again. we have raised over $10 million in private funds and served directly over 10,000 survivors and the professionals who care for them. we have connected with over one million individuals through our education and awareness initiatives and have championed crucial legislation and policy reform, which i am very pr
like free education but we need to talk about this, right. we need to talk about how we can do that. and the final thing we learn om this is that we have to build preventive structures and processes so that this thing won't happen again. you think it won't happen again but so did the japanese think it wouldn't happen. who would think that the japanese haven't done anything. how would they be in camps. look at what is happening to the muslims or under the patriot act. people just pushed away. who would think america would do that? the outsiders, no telling what they will do. we have been the moral and social vanguard of this country. we have struggled, at one with our allies, victories that not only benefited us but extended the realm of freedom in this country. we cannot remain silent when other people are suffering. [applause] we feel -- i will talk about his morning minute. we feel we might hurt our president. back to it and do more with it. first, we have to continue the struggle against our form of slavery. psychological and chemical. against all forms of oppression. , sexism an
. next comes compensation. , butuld be not just money free health. free education. we need to talk about how to do that. [applause] we learn from this is that we have to deal with structures so that this thing will not happen again. you think it won't happen again , but so did the japanese. they did not think it would happen. if they didn't do anything, how did they end up in internment camps? how about the patriot act? they could not be mentioned. who would think america would do that? the outsiders, no telling what they will do. we have been the moral and social vanguard of this country. we have struggled, at one with our allies, victories that not only benefited us but extended the realm of freedom in this country. we cannot remain silent when other people are suffering. [applause] simply because we feel -- i will talk about this more in a minute. we feel we might hurt our president. i will get back to it and do more with it. first, we have to continue the struggle against our form of slavery. psychological and chemical. against all forms of oppression. racism, classism, sexism and al
society and educated -- and education, which are the severely handicapped people who are in severe poverty. >> he makes a very good point about helping disabled people across the world. we should make sure that the framework we look up properly includes the people he says. on the wider issue of the budget, i know it's contentious. i know it's difficult to i believe we should break a promise we made to the poorest people in our world. and i would also say, to those who have their doubts come of course, there is a strong moral case for a budget, but there is also a national security case. it is remarkable that broken countries, countries affected by conflict, they have not met a single millennium goal between them. by helping to mend these entries, often by security work and aid work am i we can help them. >> in 1997, there were no excess deaths at staffordshire hospital. it was an until 2002 that there were 20 excess deaths. labor health secretary after liver health secretary did nothing. in total, 1197 excess deaths occurred. some of them were asians who died in their own feces -- some of
that address matters of elementary and secondary education, a formative action in higher education, and equal educational opportunity. he is also the reason why sarah was able to say such nice tings about me because he was my supervisor when i was there and taught me everything that i know. he will discuss issues of racial equality, growing rights and speeches in "the year of the turtle." our second speaker is peter nicholas. he is a officer of lot the. -- at the university of washington school of law. prior to pursuing in the law, professor nicholas was a research economist at the university of michigan and served as a member of the ann arbor city council. he will discuss the speeches and the current battles over gay rights, same-sex marriage, the gay minority and the gay minority in the leaders of the african american community. we have the professor of law at armored law school. before her ointment, she was a tenured professor at the university of pennsylvania law school. and she worked in the civil rights commission at the united states department of justice and headed the voting rights p
. for me, right now, the most important thing is about educating and locking arms with people so they don't say, what can i do? theyt people to know what can do and feel empowered and realize how much power they do have to say something. to speak up for somebody. and hopefully, with -- what the symbol is, i think the breast cancer analogy is so beautiful to me. when i see, breast cancer used to be a thing -- don't talk about that. now, you see people wearing the pink ribbon, and i always feel like -- rockstar. they are so proud. you see somebody that survived rest cancer and you want to jump on the bandwagon and support. you look at them differently and admire them and they are so empowered. whether it is breast cancer, are all the different things, once you have survived it, you are empowered. these's unify around issues and make it something so we stopped blaming other people and taking responsibility. this morning listening to vice president biden, he said if a woman runs across the field naked, you can arrest her for indecent exposure. but that does that give you the right to rape her
the value of education and have produced 10 nobel laureates. [applause] israelis understand the power of invention and universities educate engineers. economicit has led to growth and progress. solar power, electric cars, synthetic limbs, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they should look at tel aviv, home of research centers and startups. [applause] israelis are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. today the trade between our two countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is the kind of relationship israel should have an
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
is simply put, will my schools perform to the ability that my kids can get a great education? that is one of the challenges we took on. it is interesting -- a couple years ago before i was governor this because young woman who wisconsin in a community called milwaukee. milwaukee schools are some of the most challenged in the country. this was a first year teach who was named outstanding teacher of the year. she got noticed about that a week later she got a second notice. do you know what that notice was? she got laid off. they cut funding in education so when you have less money in those situations, even though she was named one of the best teachers in the state in her profession. she was one of the first to be laid off. why? under the old system of collective bargains, the last hired is the first fired. we not only changed collective bargaining we changed it so no longer senior or tenure, in our state we hire and fire based on merit rit. [applause] we're the ones who want to go forward. that is about being relevant. sometimes we can see the arguments on the other side. we're the ones who
subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion for transportation needs and $10 billion for infrastructure -- for an infrastructure jobback -- bank. as federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has said many times over the past few years, simply pursuing deep cuts in the short-term will slow the rate of economic growth and bring down revenues and lead to less deficit reduction. we have two paths before us. we can choose a path of austerity and indifference that will limit economic growth and increase inequality or we can choose one of inspiration and inclusion that invests in our country and creates opportunities for everyone. i choose opportunity over austerity an
're losing, our children are actually being indoctrinated in the education system. this teacher's union, they are teaching our kids the liberal philosophy, and if we could infiltrate the educational system and the media, we would probably have a better chance. host: and how do you use that? what changes need to be made in order to do that? are you not happy with current conservative outlets that are out there? caller: i would actually pay for the education from some of these conserve tizz so they could get into the school system. host: carl from martinsville, west virginia, with another call there at home this morning. here's a story from the "usa today", a few other stories we wanted to point out to you. relatives kept on campaign payrolls. an investigation that "usa today" did, 32 members of congress dispensed more than $2 million in campaign funds to pay relatives' salaries during the 2012 election cycle, a "usa today" analysis at the most recent campaign record shows. law makers have hired their children, their spouses, aunts, parents, and in-laws as consultants, account acts and re
in education reform. the've taken me around globe. i have seen firsthand the expose of economic growth in places like china, singapore, and brazil. in some of their cities on any given day, you can see dozens skyscrapers. when i return home, the mood is different. different, and worse. americans have the sense that our recovery is fragile. the greatest prosperity in a century will be enjoyed by other people in other lands, and not by our own children. tonight, i am here to tell you that this conclusion is 100% wrong. we potentially find ourselves at the threshold of our nations greatest century. we can, as reagan did, restore the great confidence of american progress and growth and optimism. tonight, as surely as you sit here, the fundamental are aligning in a way. it is there for the taking if we have the courage to grab it. and push the only problem that divide us today. consider the facts. take energy, with our new drilling technology, america will soon have an energy surplus. this is trillions of dollars in new wealth for americans. trillions of dollars. oreign-policy not overly in
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
for a fun and educational experience. since 1938 the derby has inspired thousands of the region's young people to learn the physics behind gravity racing and the engineering used to design soapbox racers. america's soapbox derby has been called the greatest amateur racing event in the world. and on june 15 it will continue to make history. the derby teaches sportsmanship, hard work and pride of accomplishment and it imbues its young participants with that same spirit of innovation that has long fueled america's greatness. young people who participate in these derbies are often sponsored by community groups, police departments, fire departments and others who want to invest in our country's future and a very direct and meaningful way -- in a very direct and meaningful way. every year i am incredibly proud of my constituents from maryland's fifth district who participate. a number of soapbox derby champions have come from the fifth district, including the 2009 s of the 2007, 2008, and last year. the winners in 2007 and 2008, kasey rader and courtney rail, respectively went on to win the
that relates to energy, about investing in education so we are competitive and number-one, to build and strengthen and sustained at have commitment to our seniors, whether their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, which cuts almost $100 billion from $98 billion, from pell grants. $100 billion from pell grants --pet and crack grants grants. and is a job loser in the short and long term. the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values, that is in support of the middle class, the backbone of our democracy, again, honoring the bows of left-handers, the other, a job loser, and ends the medicare guarantee, and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. in,hat is the week we are and now our members will be taking that message home about the contrast in budget desert -- theout observance of the third-year anniversary of the affordable care act and what that means in the lives of american working families and a celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader in rome. mention theot underfundin
. sons,cided that her four and the youngest, would be better served by a per educational methods than by various public schools -- would be better served by her educational methods. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in rk.viding that sparked -- spa i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. do you think that is derived from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at bats, and we would go to the dictionary and looking it up -- and i got pretty good at that. and we would go to the d
, and the youngest, would be -- i'm the youngest and would be better served by her educational methods than by various public schools. the family traveled around between north carolina, long island, and virginia. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in providing that spark. it's what you really want to see education represent. i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> it was totally unpredictable. there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at that, and we would go to the unabridged dict
grandson, henry adams, remembered louisa catherine fondly. in his works, the education of the adams, he described louisa catherine and her role in this house and relationship with the family. he felt that she was the odd man out, because she was born in england and educated in france. she remained a foreign personality to many of the adams's. he recollects her sitting in her paneled room, using her silver tea pot that that she brought with her from her home in england to the old house. she would entertain both herself and many guest in this room. john quincy adams and louisa would inherit this home from john adams. i thought about selling it, but then decided that it was important to the family story to hold onto the house for future generations. >> you can visit there today. >> yes. >> wonderful. where the papers? >> they are at the massachusetts historical society in boston. they used to be at the old house would distill my very, but they were transferred to the historical society for safekeeping. >> a question on facebook from genie webber. i have read excerpts from her autobiography
make the most of our human resources, and that requires better education here in the united states. we need more students we need more students studying math and science. we must fully embraced the diversity of asian americans. americans,nese currie and americans, a filipino americans. are 95 countries represented with in this district. have long consulted to better understand developments abroad. many are active in trading and investing in asia which is a source of our national wealth. but as congress i sponsor legislation to make it easier for state universities to teach strategic languages so that our .tudents are better equipped am a strong advocate for increasing the number of visas for foreigners receive advanced degrees. in the u.s. 76% of all registered patents from the top of from the top position producing units. they come from foreign students. foreign students in the u.s.. these inventors are driving economic prosperity with the consequences of their backgrounds in these hard sciences. in our current system we welcome foreign students to the united states. we provide them t
was offered social housing and now determined to improve the situation from the education. he will lose fourteen pounds in the tax and three pounds in council tax leaving 11 pounds per week after utility. based on the prime minister's experience of hardship what advice does he have for jordan? >> the point i would make to the honorable lady, first of all, the government is investing in social housing. she'll hear more about that in a moment or two. the second point, when housing benefit costs 23 billion pounds a year, we have to reform it. there's a basic issue of fairness which is why should someone who is living in private rented accommodation not receive a spare room subsidize when someone in social housing should? there's a basic issue of fairness. that's why it should be put right. >> i might be honorable member for -- i'm very proud of our coalition for sticking to -- [inaudible] >> the honorable lay by's question -- lady's question must be heard. >> we set an example for the world and later on this month the prime minister goes to bali to co-chair the high level panel to discuss
and is now studying for a levels. he is determined to improve his situation through education. from his 56 pound weekly benefits you will lose 14 pounds in the bedroom tax and three pounds in council tax. leaving just 11 pounds per week to live on after utilities. based on the prime minister's experience of hardship, what is does he have? >> the point i would make to the honorable lady is that first this government is investing in social housing and she will hear more about that in a moment or two. the second point i would make is that when housing benefit cost 23 billion pounds a year we simply have to reform it. ofre is a basic issue fairness, which is, why should somebody who is living in private rented accommodation not receive a fair room subsidy when somebody who is in social housing showed? there is a basic issue of fairness. that is why it should be put right. >> unlike the honorable member paul shipley, i am very proud of our coalition for sticking to the 0.7% target. [shouting] >> the honorable ladies question must be heard. people should not year before they ar heard. >> later o
in the republican party. withling to them educational choice and opportunity and small business. with the exception of nevada, the asian vote collapsed. now, michael targeting. e have heard from michael -- now, micro targeting. we have heard from michael barone. a friend of mine was handed an ipad and a clipboard before the election and was told, "this is the precinct you are going to walk." is onlysaid, "this four households." and they said, "that is ok. we have collins the messages -- , andve honed the messages we have decided that this is the script to appeal to those voters, and your job is to go out and get those, and nothing else. we will give you another precinct in the afternoon." she found them, and they were home, and she got the votes. that is micro targeting. ford, a former head of the council, he has said, of course, obama had a powerful message, but he was also able to find voters in places like colorado and florida that have not been found before, and we will have to emulate that if we want to have success. lastly, there is one thing we have to worry about. we are seeing an attempt t
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated. we want to lift people up from poverty, to put the american dream in reached for everybody. our party cannot hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climbed the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children we will champion school choice and solutions to lowering the cost of health care. instead of arithmetic our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. our 80 percent friend is not our 20 percent enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful of those who don't agree with a hundred percent of them. finding common ground with voters will be a top priority. so first, we're going to learn
education advisory board the leaders ofte these universities as to the occur at our can target their research facilities. i would say probably has gotten exacerbated in the realm of digital information and cyber attacks. you no longer have to rely on an individual becomes your asset to gather the secrets in the cyber arena. it is just as easy to have somebody familiar with a cyberworld sitting in shanghai are beijing where some place in russia to attack the networks and export the information. a third is more substantial than it was a tenor 15 years ago. substantial is more than it was 10 or 15 years ago. rote to youto -- w about security lapses at the nasa centers. i saw that the fbi and dhs were involved and in the apprehension of a credible individual being held. you have any comments about that case? think it is indicative of the threat he mentioned. the arrest occurred over the weekend and is now in of the court proceeding . happening at nasa langley and i saw your testimony last week's with regard to clapper with regard to china, ames or be happening at places?rd or other
and educational grants to train people how to be safe in using their guns, and also provide for an age level for young people not being able to have these guns. this is the way that america wants us to go. let us travel a pattern of saving jobs and preventing gun violence, intervening in the lives of those who need our protection. that's what this congress should be doing, providing the pathway for america's success. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? mr. rogers: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the speaker may postpone further proceedings on the motion to concur in the senate amendments to h.r. 933, as though under clause 8-a-1-a of rule 20. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. bjection is heard. objection is withdrawn. there is no objection, so ordered. the gentleman from contract seek recognition. mr. rogers: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r.
and innovation that relates to energy. it's about investing in education so that we are competitive and number one to build that, strengthens and sustains our commitment to our seniors, whether it's their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, billion, almost $100 $the 8 billion from pell grants, $100 billion from pell grants, and in the decade ends the is a job uarantee loser in the short-term and even more so in the long-term. so the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values to support of the middle class, which is the backbone of our democracy. again honoring the vows of our founders. the other a job loser ends the medicare guarantee and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. be - now our members will taking that message home about the contrast in budget priorities about the observance of the third year anniversary of health care, affordable care act, and what that means in the lives of america's working families. and in celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader until rome, pope f
, but john did. >> she was born in england and educated in france and she remained a phone personality to many of the adams, but not to henry as a world traveler herself. she was very well educated, very sophisticated socially i would say. she sort of entertained john quincy's road to the white house. >> she was not happy about returning to washington as the wife of a congressman. >> louisa catherine adams essentially became the campaign manager for her husband, john quincy adams' run for the presidency in 1824 by dominating the capital city's social circuit. following a contested election, the adams' four years in the white house were a turbulent period in american politics and washington society. we'll look at louisa adams' relationship with her husband john quincy adams and john and abigail on the road to 1600 pennsylvania avenue. good evening and welcome to our continuing series on first ladies influence and image in partnership with the white house historical association. the next installment is on louisa catherine adams, the wife of john quincy adams. we have two guests at the ta
. consumers are informed and educated as to what their rights are versus the rights of the maker or carrier might be. going forward, we all have roles in terms of making sure we know exactly what we're talking about. we do not want to undermine intellectual property rights. we want consumers the freedom to contract with those carriers and be able to transfer their devices around. they will the device, but not necessarily that until actual property rights. the white house made it clear they support devices when you are not under contract. exactly. if you have a contract, that is a subsidy for your phone. >> you are right. i am sure bloomberg reported that. a lot of outlets didn't. so you have these images of consumers being hauled off in handcuffs. that is not happening and it will not happen. you are right. once you own something or on the license to something, then you ought to be able to think about carrier choice. that is available now, by the way. todd shields, tell us what is going on. there is a long history going back. there was a big treaty to go sheesh and in dubai in the past dece
went. you know, i could not see you with a west point education, it has opened up a lot.it is much more of a liberal arts education now. then it was engineering and military tactics. i had no interest in that at all and i did not want a military career. >> when did you first read "witness"? >> so many years ago. i cannot remember when, probably when i was in college and after that cold friday, and i read "witness", i think three times now.my family has not to read it. with communism having waned, it will be harder for them to do it. >> so what is the big deal? >> he was a great writer, a beautiful writer, but he was a soviet spy, who ultimately rejected communism, embraced christianity, and felt the struggle in the world was not just between the soviet union and the united states, it was between communism and christianity. but of course he famously said he thought he was joining the losing side not the winning side, and then, of course, his famous clash with the state department official who he identified as the communist spy and all the liberal intelligence, and ultimately, now we know
assistance with basic services including education for syrian children so far from on, whose lives have been up in did. as parents, we can only imagine how heartbreaking that must be for any parent, to see their children having to go through those kinds of tumult they are experiencing. as our partnership improves, the lives of not only the jordanian people, but people across the region. your majesty, i want to express my great appreciation for our partnership. thent to thank you and jordanian people for the hospitality you have shown me, and for my fellow americans. this is my last visit. tom looking forward tomorrow, weather permitting, seeing one of the greats waters of history, that the world can experience thanks to jordan and its people. thank you. >> yes? >> thank you, your majesty. i want to ask you -- how are you going to keep the borders open for the syrian regime? anything could happen at any time. thet the electricity or water? you might find 1000 refugees. that is what you spoke about, your majesty. i want to thank you again, and i just want to know -- you are the leading superpo
. are yourdren responsibility. here in texas we are having to educate $10,000 per child per , and anyway, it is just absolutely ridiculous. all of this is because our government have absolutely refused to close the border all of these years. the country is really getting fed up with it. size,wn in texas of any they have a real organized mexican gang. drugs are coming in. are smugglingw in middle easterners and from all over the world. anyway, the government has cut back on enforcement should not cost americans $160 per day to detain someone. detain them long enough to get a bus to take them back. anti-illegal how immigration groups in arizona met the news last month that people from immigration detention centers were being let go. one phoenix-based group stands with arizona. executive director says that affirmative homeland security was using immigration security as a political weapon. he wrote the shocking, lawless merely to score points on sequestration proved we have said all along, they are far too politicized to be trusted to implement a good deal, or the gang of eight's immigration
and women who served the best health care, the best educational opportunities, and the best job available. they deserve nothing less. it is my hope that this reckless and shortsighted decision will mark a turning point in american history and that that we will never again wage an unnecessary war. we must use all the tools of america's power in resolving disputes, including diplomacy. we must have sufficient congressional debate. we only debated this go to war resolution probably a couple hours. we need more debate and oversight before ever putting another u.s. soldier in harm's way. finally, mr. speaker, just like in iraq, there is no military solution in afghanistan. we need to bring the war in afghanistan to an accelerated end and to bring our troops home now. dr. martin luther king jr. in expressing his sentiment during a different war said, the bombs in vietnam exploded home. they destroy the hopes and possibilities of a decent america. let us put this decade of perpetual warfare behind us, invest in our veterans, our children, and get about the business of nation building here at hom
. the future's bright but only if we educate the half truths and begin telling the real story of america's natural gas revolution. the stories about technology, private sector innovation, investment, financial risk, thousands of new jobs, new competition, new growth, a growing and better standard of living for more americans, lower energy costs, new industries, a revitalized energy sector, more jobs, more growth, energy security and optimism. this is the story of america's natural gas revolution. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized for ne minute. >> mr. speaker, the ryan budget once again places the burden of deficit reduction on working americans while failing to stop the frivolous spending of oil subsidies for companies that cost americans billions of dollars every year. ms. duckworth: i'm concerned that it will
of various scenarios, how things can be handled. a few, what is happening? caller: i am in education, and we have civilians students and military in the same classes. of theworking options next go around of not having civilians in the classroom because they cannot be in there for five days a week. we are looking at all the different options, have to spend a lot of tried -- time. host: let's hear from another federal worker, a democrat in virginia. good morning, michael. say godi would like to bless america and c-span, and thank you for being here. i would like to say, the sequestration is going to have a big affect up and down the east coast, from here to texas, that firstpan into the early and second quarter of next year. work, psychologically, i see people slowing down. you know, inlike, a grip, waiting for some thing to happen. i have friends and other agencies, and other parts of virginia and places. i just see the intensity. cut ofu throw in the almost $10,000 for me, for 22 days, you add the payroll tax, i am looking at a setback of -- or a contraction of 13,000 dollars or $14,000 this
of the health education committee, this is not just a veterans issue, it is an issue for the entire nation, but we have in terms of mental health providers. these long wait times that i mentioned are partially caused by staffing shortages. i am pleased that secretaries hassecchi -- shinsechi applied to hire more mental health conditions. as of the 13th they fired more than3000, including more 1100 of these new mental health clinicians. this is good progress towards reaching their goal. emphasize this point, i am very concerned that va has hired only 37 clinicians in the last two months. i understand the challenges. i think we all understand the challenges. you do not walk down the street and get the first person. you want to make sure the person you are hiring is well-trained and of the quality that the veterans deserve, but clearly the va must step up hiring if they intend to meet their goal of 16 new clinicians by june of this year. they will be attempting to meet over 500 in the next few months and i do not see how that is possible. we do want to talk to the va about how they are moving
and who are often excluded from society and education, those severely disabled young people who face grinding poverty, ill health, and the disadvantage of those disabilities? will the prime minister give priority to them in developments over the next two years? prime minister. >> he makes a very good point about helping disabled people across the world, and we should make sure that a framework we look at properly includes the people he says. the poorest people in our wrld. and i would also say to those on the wider issue of our aid budget, i know it is contentious and i know it is difficult, but i believe we should not break a promise that we made to the poorest people in our world. to those who have their doubts i say that of course there is a strong moral case for our aid budget, but there is also a national security case. it is remarkable that the broken countries, countries affected by conflict, have not met one single millennium developmentby helping to mend those countries, often through security work as well as aid work, we can help the poorest in our world. >> chris skidmore.
country at the forefront of the global economy. israelis understand the value of education and have produced 10 nobel laureates. [applause] understand the power of invention and universities educate engineers. that spirit has led to economic growth and progress. ,olar power, electric cars synthetic limbs, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they , home ofok at tel aviv research centers and startups. [applause] are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. twoy the trade between our countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is
the fact that the democratic budget invests in people and when you invest in people an jobs and education -- ms. slaughter: i yield the gentlelady an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. jackson lee: when off preschool program, when you have programs that transition women out of their homes after raising children into jobs, when off program that allows young people with a college degree to get a job, when you have programs that invest in infrastructure and build highways and bridges that america is begging for, like we built the hoover dam, then our grandchildren and children will receive an america that we invested in, they'll receive a fwift and they'll be able to work with their hands and their minds and they will have the ability to pay down any debt, they'll close any deficit, and they'll be grateful to do it because america will be the greatest nation that it condition. don't constantly pound us with our grandchildren and our children. right now, today, america can afford to pay for what we are doing in the van hollen democratic budget becaus
not only to help but also educate those people in the local flood plains who are living in flood plains about what risk is there. we build storm risk reduction projects but we call them reduction not protection projects because you are not totally protected. it's an opportunity for us to educate people as to what it is we should be looking to the future. we are looking to our planning process within the army corp of engineers. and looking at future projects because that's a reality and we need to be able to adapt now to what it is we can anticipate in the future. i think in your planning in doing that is a way for us to be able to anticipate and also hopefully be able to have some risk reduction in future disasters. >> thank you very much for that. i'm going to give a very short closing statement of my own looking back on the last couple of hours and what we've heard and said here. something you said ten or 15 minutes ago, in each disaster we learn something new. and i used to say to my sons there is nothing wrong with making mistakes. we all make mistakes. i am the only democrat around
understand and address that threat. we also have a national security higher education advisory board. we try to educate the leaders of these universities as to the threats that can occur at our target their research facilities. i would say probably has gotten exacerbated in the realm of digital information and cyber attacks. you no longer have to rely on an individual becoming your asset to gather the secrets in the cyber arena. it is just as easy to have somebody familiar with a cyberworld sitting in shanghai are beijing or some place in russia to attack the networks and export the information. a threat is more substantial than it was 10 or 15 years ago. >> i wrote to you about security lapses at the nasa centers. i saw that the fbi and dhs were involved in the apprehension of a credible individual being held. you have any comments about that case? >> i think it is indicative of the threat you mentioned. the arrest occurred over the weekend and is now in the court proceeding. >> if it was happening at nasa langley and i saw your testimony last week's with regard to clapper with regard to ch
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